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Single vs. Dual CPU Xeon Gold?
posted by Anonymous  on April 18, 2018, 12:15 p.m. (3 months, 29 days ago)
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I'm looking at the new HP Z8 workstations, and was wondering what experience people are having comparing Single vs. Dual CPU machines.
Are you better off going with Dual CPU (More L3 Cache, more bandwidth) vs. single CPU (less handshaking with other CPU).
In particular, I'm focusing on this for running the usual Nuke and Maya (with Vray) jobs, so I wasnt planning to get a crazy number of cores, so possibly looking at either:
Dual Xeon Gold 6128 (3.4 Ghz 6 Core).vs.Single CPU Xeon 6136 12 core (3Ghz 12 core)
The single core is very slightly slower (not sure its noticeable), but quite a bit cheaper.
I'm deliberately going with a high clock speed, since we sadly live in a world where far too much is not multi-threaded, and 12 cores seems like a pretty good balance, or am I missing something?
Sam.



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Response from Greg Whynott @ April 24, 2018, 1:05 p.m.
gwhynott maybe? ;)

On Tue, Apr 24, 2018 at 3:26 AM, Peter Smith <peter.smith@framestore.com> wrote:
Can you remember your username? :-)

On 23 April 2018 at 22:02, greg whynott <greg.whynott@gmail.com> wrote:
That exact/very computer JF, I (very probably) used it a few months. When SGI would put together large machines for customers like NASA, GOV, Academia, Energy and researchers - they would do burn in tests for quite a while before dismantling it for delivery. I still remember the feeling of logging into them and seeing 128 CPUs then 1024 CPUs and so on... During this time they were in MountianView or sometimes Chippewa falls (I think.. bad memory). These were the days you ordered your supercomputer a year or so ahead of delivery.

I use to participate in the "SETI @ Home" when it was a big thing, and ran it on these machines being tested for days at a time, I've no idea but if graphs still exist you can find (gwhynott@aw.sgi.com) where I went from 389473987434 place in the world up to the top 100/0.. (the 90's were good to me but I forget a lot of it) in a matter of days or so. lol.

Wish crypto currency was a thing back then. lol.

greg






On Thu, Apr 19, 2018 at 5:59 PM, Jean-Francois Panisset <panisset@gmail.com> wrote:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASCI_Blue_Mountain

Sadly never got to play with more than a single rack, single pipe Onyx2...

JF



On Thu, Apr 19, 2018 at 2:23 PM, greg whynott <greg.whynott@gmail.com> wrote:
> Install additional SGI XIO ASICs.
>
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Response from Anonymous @ April 24, 2018, 3:30 a.m.
Can you remember your username? :-)

On 23 April 2018 at 22:02, greg whynott <greg.whynott@gmail.com> wrote:
That exact/very computer JF, I (very probably) used it a few months. When SGI would put together large machines for customers like NASA, GOV, Academia, Energy and researchers - they would do burn in tests for quite a while before dismantling it for delivery. I still remember the feeling of logging into them and seeing 128 CPUs then 1024 CPUs and so on... During this time they were in MountianView or sometimes Chippewa falls (I think.. bad memory). These were the days you ordered your supercomputer a year or so ahead of delivery.

I use to participate in the "SETI @ Home" when it was a big thing, and ran it on these machines being tested for days at a time, I've no idea but if graphs still exist you can find (gwhynott@aw.sgi.com) where I went from 389473987434 place in the world up to the top 100/0.. (the 90's were good to me but I forget a lot of it) in a matter of days or so. lol.

Wish crypto currency was a thing back then. lol.

greg






On Thu, Apr 19, 2018 at 5:59 PM, Jean-Francois Panisset <panisset@gmail.com> wrote:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASCI_Blue_Mountain

Sadly never got to play with more than a single rack, single pipe Onyx2...

JF



On Thu, Apr 19, 2018 at 2:23 PM, greg whynott <greg.whynott@gmail.com> wrote:
> Install additional SGI XIO ASICs.
>
> To unsubscribe from the list send a blank e-mail to
> mailto:studiosysadmins-discuss-request@studiosysadmins.com?subject=unsubscribe
To unsubscribe from the list send a blank e-mail to mailto:studiosysadmins-discuss-request@studiosysadmins.com?subject=unsubscribe


To unsubscribe from the list send a blank e-mail to mailto:studiosysadmins-discuss-request@studiosysadmins.com?subject=unsubscribe



--
Framestore Peter Smith Senior Systems Engineer
London New York Los Angeles Chicago Montral
T+44 (0)20 7208 2600 M+44 (0)7816 123009
28 Chancery Lane, London WC2A 1LB
Twitter Facebook framestore.com



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Response from Greg Dickie @ April 23, 2018, 5:55 p.m.
I got to see some of those computers at UCAR. Never got close to a console though :-(
Greg

--Greg Dickiejust a guy514-983-5400
On Apr 23, 2018, at 17:02, greg whynott <greg.whynott@gmail.com> wrote:

That exact/very computer JF,  I (very probably) used it a few months.   When SGI would put together large machines for customers like NASA, GOV, Academia,  Energy and researchers - they would do burn in tests for quite a while before dismantling it for delivery.   I still remember the feeling of logging into them and seeing 128 CPUs then 1024 CPUs and so on...  During this time they were in MountianView or sometimes Chippewa falls (I think.. bad memory).  These were the days you ordered your supercomputer a year or so ahead of delivery.

I use to participate in the "SETI @ Home" when it was a big thing,  and ran it on these machines being tested for days at a time,  I've no idea but if graphs still exist you can find (gwhynott@aw.sgi.com) where I went from 389473987434 place in the world up to the top 100/0.. (the 90's were good to me but I forget a lot of it) in a matter of days or so.  lol.  

Wish crypto currency was a thing back then.  lol. 

greg






On Thu, Apr 19, 2018 at 5:59 PM, Jean-Francois Panisset <panisset@gmail.com> wrote:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASCI_Blue_Mountain

Sadly never got to play with more than a single rack, single pipe Onyx2...

JF



On Thu, Apr 19, 2018 at 2:23 PM, greg whynott <greg.whynott@gmail.com> wrote:
> Install additional SGI XIO ASICs.
>
> To unsubscribe from the list send a blank e-mail to
> mailto:studiosysadmins-discuss-request@studiosysadmins.com?subject=unsubscribe
To unsubscribe from the list send a blank e-mail to mailto:studiosysadmins-discuss-request@studiosysadmins.com?subject=unsubscribe

To unsubscribe from the list send a blank e-mail to mailto:studiosysadmins-discuss-request@studiosysadmins.com?subject=unsubscribe

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Response from Greg Whynott @ April 23, 2018, 5:10 p.m.
And I was a gentleman about it, all processes were ran with npri. ;)

http://nixdoc.net/man-pages/irix/man1/npri.1.html




On Mon, Apr 23, 2018 at 5:02 PM, greg whynott <greg.whynott@gmail.com> wrote:
That exact/very computer JF, I (very probably) used it a few months. When SGI would put together large machines for customers like NASA, GOV, Academia, Energy and researchers - they would do burn in tests for quite a while before dismantling it for delivery. I still remember the feeling of logging into them and seeing 128 CPUs then 1024 CPUs and so on... During this time they were in MountianView or sometimes Chippewa falls (I think.. bad memory). These were the days you ordered your supercomputer a year or so ahead of delivery.

I use to participate in the "SETI @ Home" when it was a big thing, and ran it on these machines being tested for days at a time, I've no idea but if graphs still exist you can find (gwhynott@aw.sgi.com) where I went from 389473987434 place in the world up to the top 100/0.. (the 90's were good to me but I forget a lot of it) in a matter of days or so. lol.

Wish crypto currency was a thing back then. lol.

greg






On Thu, Apr 19, 2018 at 5:59 PM, Jean-Francois Panisset <panisset@gmail.com> wrote:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASCI_Blue_Mountain

Sadly never got to play with more than a single rack, single pipe Onyx2...

JF



On Thu, Apr 19, 2018 at 2:23 PM, greg whynott <greg.whynott@gmail.com> wrote:
> Install additional SGI XIO ASICs.
>
> To unsubscribe from the list send a blank e-mail to
> mailto:studiosysadmins-discuss-request@studiosysadmins.com?subject=unsubscribe
To unsubscribe from the list send a blank e-mail to mailto:studiosysadmins-discuss-request@studiosysadmins.com?subject=unsubscribe



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Response from Greg Whynott @ April 23, 2018, 5:05 p.m.
That exact/very computer JF, I (very probably) used it a few months. When SGI would put together large machines for customers like NASA, GOV, Academia, Energy and researchers - they would do burn in tests for quite a while before dismantling it for delivery. I still remember the feeling of logging into them and seeing 128 CPUs then 1024 CPUs and so on... During this time they were in MountianView or sometimes Chippewa falls (I think.. bad memory). These were the days you ordered your supercomputer a year or so ahead of delivery.

I use to participate in the "SETI @ Home" when it was a big thing, and ran it on these machines being tested for days at a time, I've no idea but if graphs still exist you can find (gwhynott@aw.sgi.com) where I went from 389473987434 place in the world up to the top 100/0.. (the 90's were good to me but I forget a lot of it) in a matter of days or so. lol.

Wish crypto currency was a thing back then. lol.

greg






On Thu, Apr 19, 2018 at 5:59 PM, Jean-Francois Panisset <panisset@gmail.com> wrote:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASCI_Blue_Mountain

Sadly never got to play with more than a single rack, single pipe Onyx2...

JF



On Thu, Apr 19, 2018 at 2:23 PM, greg whynott <greg.whynott@gmail.com> wrote:
> Install additional SGI XIO ASICs.
>
> To unsubscribe from the list send a blank e-mail to
> mailto:studiosysadmins-discuss-request@studiosysadmins.com?subject=unsubscribe
To unsubscribe from the list send a blank e-mail to mailto:studiosysadmins-discuss-request@studiosysadmins.com?subject=unsubscribe


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Response from Jean-Francois Panisset @ April 19, 2018, 6 p.m.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASCI_Blue_Mountain Sadly never got to play with more than a single rack, single pipe Onyx2... JF On Thu, Apr 19, 2018 at 2:23 PM, greg whynott wrote: > Install additional SGI XIO ASICs. > > To unsubscribe from the list send a blank e-mail to > mailto:studiosysadmins-discuss-request@studiosysadmins.com?subject=unsubscribe To unsubscribe from the list send a blank e-mail to mailto:studiosysadmins-discuss-request@studiosysadmins.com?subject=unsubscribe

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Response from Greg Whynott @ April 19, 2018, 5:25 p.m.
Install additional SGI XIO ASICs.

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Response from William Sandler @ April 18, 2018, 3 p.m.
And don't forget the extra PCI-E lanes required for any existing and future NVMe drives you might want to add.

William Sandler
All Things Media, LLC
william.sandler@allthingsmedia.com
On Wed, Apr 18, 2018 at 2:47 PM, Jean-Francois Panisset <panisset@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi Sam,

Not only will having a single CPU in a Z8 machine disable half the
DIMM slots, but it will also remove half the available PCIe lanes. If
you look at page 2 of the QuickSpecs document at:

http://www8.hp.com/h20195/v2/GetPDF.aspx/c05527763.pdf

you will end up with a single x16 PCIe slot instead of 3 in a single
CPU configuration, which negates most of the advantages of the Z8
chassis.

Are you planning to also use this machine to join the render farm when
idle / overnight? If so it definitely makes sense to go with dual
Xeons with large numbers of cores, since offline renderers typically
scale quite well with number of cores these days.

If this is purely an interactive machine, I'd go with lower count,
higher speed cores, with the caveat that you will definitely want 2
CPUs if you want more than 1 GPU. But then a i7 / i9 machine may turn
out to be more appropriate, and you can throw the money you are saving
on CPUs at more / better GPUs.

SuperMicro now has i7/i9 machines with IPMI, which makes managing
those machines a lot simpler (in an ideal world I would have IPMI on
every single machine in the facility).

JF





On Wed, Apr 18, 2018 at 9:18 AM, Shawn Wallbridge <swallbridge@gmail.com> wrote:
> You will limit the memory capacity and throughput with a single cpu.
>
> Other than that, I am not sure you would see much difference.
>
> shawn
>
> On Wed, Apr 18, 2018 at 12:12 PM Sam Richards <sam.richards@taurich.org>
> wrote:
>>
>> I'm looking at the new HP Z8 workstations, and was wondering what
>> experience people are having comparing Single vs. Dual CPU machines.
>>
>> Are you better off going with Dual CPU (More L3 Cache, more bandwidth) vs.
>> single CPU (less handshaking with other CPU).
>>
>> In particular, I'm focusing on this for running the usual Nuke and Maya
>> (with Vray) jobs, so I wasnt planning to get a crazy number of cores, so
>> possibly looking at either:
>>
>> Dual Xeon Gold 6128 (3.4 Ghz 6 Core).
>> vs.
>> Single CPU Xeon 6136 12 core (3Ghz 12 core)
>>
>> The single core is very slightly slower (not sure its noticeable), but
>> quite a bit cheaper.
>>
>> I'm deliberately going with a high clock speed, since we sadly live in a
>> world where far too much is not multi-threaded, and 12 cores seems like a
>> pretty good balance, or am I missing something?
>>
>> Sam.
>>
>>
>>
>> To unsubscribe from the list send a blank e-mail to
>> mailto:studiosysadmins-discuss-request@studiosysadmins.com?subject=unsubscribe
>
>
> To unsubscribe from the list send a blank e-mail to
> mailto:studiosysadmins-discuss-request@studiosysadmins.com?subject=unsubscribe
To unsubscribe from the list send a blank e-mail to mailto:studiosysadmins-discuss-request@studiosysadmins.com?subject=unsubscribe


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Response from Jean-Francois Panisset @ April 18, 2018, 2:50 p.m.
Hi Sam, Not only will having a single CPU in a Z8 machine disable half the DIMM slots, but it will also remove half the available PCIe lanes. If you look at page 2 of the QuickSpecs document at: http://www8.hp.com/h20195/v2/GetPDF.aspx/c05527763.pdf you will end up with a single x16 PCIe slot instead of 3 in a single CPU configuration, which negates most of the advantages of the Z8 chassis. Are you planning to also use this machine to join the render farm when idle / overnight? If so it definitely makes sense to go with dual Xeons with large numbers of cores, since offline renderers typically scale quite well with number of cores these days. If this is purely an interactive machine, I'd go with lower count, higher speed cores, with the caveat that you will definitely want 2 CPUs if you want more than 1 GPU. But then a i7 / i9 machine may turn out to be more appropriate, and you can throw the money you are saving on CPUs at more / better GPUs. SuperMicro now has i7/i9 machines with IPMI, which makes managing those machines a lot simpler (in an ideal world I would have IPMI on every single machine in the facility). JF On Wed, Apr 18, 2018 at 9:18 AM, Shawn Wallbridge wrote: > You will limit the memory capacity and throughput with a single cpu. > > Other than that, I am not sure you would see much difference. > > shawn > > On Wed, Apr 18, 2018 at 12:12 PM Sam Richards > wrote: >> >> I'm looking at the new HP Z8 workstations, and was wondering what >> experience people are having comparing Single vs. Dual CPU machines. >> >> Are you better off going with Dual CPU (More L3 Cache, more bandwidth) vs. >> single CPU (less handshaking with other CPU). >> >> In particular, I'm focusing on this for running the usual Nuke and Maya >> (with Vray) jobs, so I wasnt planning to get a crazy number of cores, so >> possibly looking at either: >> >> Dual Xeon Gold 6128 (3.4 Ghz 6 Core). >> vs. >> Single CPU Xeon 6136 12 core (3Ghz 12 core) >> >> The single core is very slightly slower (not sure its noticeable), but >> quite a bit cheaper. >> >> I'm deliberately going with a high clock speed, since we sadly live in a >> world where far too much is not multi-threaded, and 12 cores seems like a >> pretty good balance, or am I missing something? >> >> Sam. >> >> >> >> To unsubscribe from the list send a blank e-mail to >> mailto:studiosysadmins-discuss-request@studiosysadmins.com?subject=unsubscribe > > > To unsubscribe from the list send a blank e-mail to > mailto:studiosysadmins-discuss-request@studiosysadmins.com?subject=unsubscribe To unsubscribe from the list send a blank e-mail to mailto:studiosysadmins-discuss-request@studiosysadmins.com?subject=unsubscribe

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Response from Shawn Wallbridge @ April 18, 2018, 12:20 p.m.
You will limit the memory capacity and throughput with a single cpu.
Other than that, I am not sure you would see much difference.
shawn
On Wed, Apr 18, 2018 at 12:12 PM Sam Richards <sam.richards@taurich.org> wrote:
I'm looking at the new HP Z8 workstations, and was wondering what experience people are having comparing Single vs. Dual CPU machines.
Are you better off going with Dual CPU (More L3 Cache, more bandwidth) vs. single CPU (less handshaking with other CPU).
In particular, I'm focusing on this for running the usual Nuke and Maya (with Vray) jobs, so I wasnt planning to get a crazy number of cores, so possibly looking at either:
Dual Xeon Gold 6128 (3.4 Ghz 6 Core).vs.Single CPU Xeon 6136 12 core (3Ghz 12 core)
The single core is very slightly slower (not sure its noticeable), but quite a bit cheaper.
I'm deliberately going with a high clock speed, since we sadly live in a world where far too much is not multi-threaded, and 12 cores seems like a pretty good balance, or am I missing something?
Sam.


To unsubscribe from the list send a blank e-mail to mailto:studiosysadmins-discuss-request@studiosysadmins.com?subject=unsubscribe

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